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The new study, published in Methods in Ecology and Evolution by Dr Manabu Sakamoto and Dr Chris Venditti, from Reading, and Professor Michael Benton, from Bristol, says a technique used to 'correct' records of diversity in fossils is actually giving misleading results.

It means almost a decade's worth of work aimed at providing an insight into evolution may be misleading as it was based on this fundamental error.

This illustration shows the Moon passing through Earth's shadow during a typical lunar eclipse.

The Moon is slightly tinted when it passes through the light outer portion of the shadow, the penumbra, but turns dark red as it passes through the central portion of the shadow, called the umbra.

Important: As long as the candidates are not contacted, they are kindly asked not to request any additional information about the status of their application.The Very Next Thing, Casting Crowns’ latest offering, is centered on the idea that what’s next for the Lord is often what’s right next to you.This collection of songs is meant to meet listeners wherever they are at in their walk and aims to encourage acting out the next step of love.Dr Sakamoto, evolutionary biologist at the University of Reading, said: "Our work calls into question nearly a decade's worth of scientific reports and interpretations on the way life on Earth has evolved.The researchers ran thousands of simulations to test the data correction method, but found it failed to return correct results in as much as 100% of the simulated cases.[Tim Jones]An eclipse is the result of the total or partial masking of a celestial body by another along an observer's line of sight.